NC Commerce

Labor and Economic Analysis Division, Department of Commerce

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North Carolina has a tight labor market, which is creating opportunities for jobseekers but challenging employers who are looking to hire. This article uses LEAD’s North Carolina Labor Supply/Demand data to show how the labor market has tightened across our state’s various regions and occupational groups.
The labor market is heating up across much of the United States, with employers posting a record number of job openings and reportedly turning to overlooked population groups to meet their need for talent. This article uses data from the North Carolina Common Follow-up System (CFS) to show how a tight labor market can bolster the employment prospects of former prisoners.

After a volatile year, newly-released data revisions show that North Carolina’s unemployment and labor force participation rates are in fact on a steady path as we head into 2018.  This article explains what labor market watchers can learn from these new data and provides some helpful tips to avoid getting caught off-guard by data revisions.

Just in time for your Monday mid-morning coffee break, here is a brief review of local and regional news from the Tar Heel State: North Carolina’s economy has changed a lot in recent decades, but it’s not done shifting. . . Rocky Mount Mills features a brewery incubator. . . UNC campuses that saw tuition cuts due to NC Promise are experiencing a surge in applications.
  • 8 January 2018
  • Author: Brett Dyson
  • Number of views: 973
Just in time for your Monday mid-morning coffee break, here is a brief review of local and regional news from the Tar Heel State: College towns are high-poverty (but not necessarily poor). . . A backlash in Holly Springs over new development and construction. . . Atlantic Coast natural gas pipeline is one step closer to reality.
  • 18 December 2017
  • Author: Brett Dyson
  • Number of views: 568
Just in time for your Monday mid-morning coffee break, here is a brief review of local and regional news from the Tar Heel State: Fayetteville as a population magnet. . . A meat plant closing in Marion wreaks havoc on the local food industry.
  • 13 November 2017
  • Author: Brett Dyson
  • Number of views: 559
Just in time for your Monday mid-morning coffee break, here is a brief review of local and regional news from the Tar Heel State: An impending Christmas tree shortage. . . Hemp is a potential success for North Carolina agriculture. . . Affordable housing in our state has practically vanished. . . The CSX project in Rocky Mount might be in trouble.
  • 6 November 2017
  • Author: Brett Dyson
  • Number of views: 732
The United Census Bureau introduced the 2017 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) structure this year, as is done every five years. When looking at changes occurring in North Carolina, there are several worth noting.
Just in time for your Monday mid-morning coffee break, here is a brief review of local and regional news from the Tar Heel State: Waynesville’s economic development strategy. . . Autumn colors lead to a surge of tourists in Western NC. . . A profile of Hispanic employment and Hispanic-owned businesses in our state. . . UNC SOG explores Asheville’s downtown revitalization.
  • 23 October 2017
  • Author: Brett Dyson
  • Number of views: 996
The success of large urban metros has been well-documented across the country; They have long-since recovered from the Great Recession, while rural areas are still struggling by and large.  The idea that our very different urban and rural areas are competing against each other might not be fair, or realistic.  The question we need to be asking is how are these areas doing relative to similarly sized geographies across the United States?  And more importantly, what can we learn from these comparable areas outside of our state?
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