NC Commerce

Labor and Economic Analysis Division, Department of Commerce

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The LEAD Feed
Just in time for your Monday mid-morning coffee break, here is a brief review of local and regional news from the Tar Heel State: A profile of a Pitt County nonprofit providing vocational training services. . . Tryon prepares for the “Olympics of Horses”. . . Fewer North Carolinians will pay state income tax in 2019. . . The commercial real estate market in downtown Charlotte heats up.

North Carolina's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased 0.3 of a percentage point to 4.2 percent from May’s revised rate of 4.5 percent.

While the Sandhills Prosperity Zone's population has grown  since 2000 (mainly through natural increase rather than in-migration), the number of jobs has actually fallen by 1.7 percent. At the same time, the industry mix of the region has shifted in ways typical of other rural regions of the state—with a decline in manufacturing and a shift to jobs in health care, retail, and accommodation and food service.

  • 29 June 2017
  • Author: Josh Levy
  • Number of views: 79

In May, not seasonally adjusted unemployment rates increased in 67 of North Carolina's 100 counties.

  • 28 June 2017
  • Author: Brett Dyson
  • Number of views: 101

North Carolina's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased 0.2 of a percentage point to 4.5 percent from April’s revised rate of 4.7 percent.

  • 16 June 2017
  • Author: Brett Dyson
  • Number of views: 178
Decline in the labor force participation is an often-discussed topic of the recent Great Recession and its recovery. Numerous demographic factors have played a role in the decline, including the growing number of older Americans and their decreasing labor force participation rates. However, there has been a real effect from the decline of youth employment – primarily youth seeking summer work.[1] This article discusses youth summer employment in North Carolina, and its changes over the past two decades.[2]


[1] If you are interested in understanding youth summer employment on a national level, please read this recent Wall Street Journal article.

[2] Youth is defined as those ages 16 to 23 while working age are ages 24 to 65. Summer employment encompasses June, July, and August. 

Just in time for your Monday mid-morning coffee break, here is a brief review of local and regional news from the Tar Heel State: tight labor market in Asheville leaves employers struggling to find workers. …Chinese solar panel delegation looks to invest in Charlotte region. …Lowes outsources IT jobs to India.

Just in time for your Monday mid-morning coffee break, here is a brief review of local and regional news from the Tar Heel State: foreign manufacturers continue to express interest in the Charlotte region. …Bank closures impact economic development in rural areas of the state. …A lack of affordable housing poses challenges in Appalachia.

What are the jobs of future and where will they be?  What are some of the better career options?  LEAD recently released new long term regional projections and the 2017 Star Jobs Lists at both the statewide and regional levels.

Want to try to see into the future?  LEAD recently completed long term regional industry and occupation projections at both the state and local levels. 

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